The Buffalo Springfield


Band members                              Related acts

  line up 1 (1966-67)

- Ritchie Furay -- vocals, guitar 
- Dewey Martin (aka Walter Milton Dwayne Midkiff) (RIP 2009) --

  vocals, drums
- Bruce Palmer -- bass, guitar, backing vocals
- Stephen Stills -- vocals, guitar 
- Neil Young -- vocals, guitar 

 

  line up 2 (1967)

- Ritchie Furay -- vocals, guitar 
NEW - Kevin Koblin -- bass (replaced Bruce Palmer)
- Dewey Martin (aka Walter Milton Dwayne Midkiff) (RIP 2009) --

  vocals, drums 
- Stephen Stills -- vocals, guitar 
- Neil Young -- vocals, guitar 

 

  line up 3 (1967)

NEW - Jim Fielder -- bass (replaced Kevin Koblin) - bass 
- Ritchie Furay -- vocals, guitar 
- Dewey Martin (aka Walter Milton Dwayne Midkiff) (RIP 2009) --

  vocals, drums 
- Stephen Stills -- vocals, guitar
- Neil Young -- vocals, guitar 

 

  line up 3 (1967)

- Ritchie Furay -- vocals, guitar 
NEW - Doug Hastings -- vocals, guitar  (replaced Neil Young)
- Dewey Martin (aka Walter Milton Dwayne Midkiff) (RIP 2009) --

  vocals, drums 
NEW - Jim Messina -- vocals, bass, guitar, (replaced Jim Fielder) 
- Stephen Stills -- vocals, guitar

 

 

 

- The Au Go Go Singers (Stephen Stills)

- Crosby, Stills and Nash (Stephen Stills)
- Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young (Stephen Stills and Neil Young)

- The Daily Flash (Doug Hastings)
- Ritchie Furay Band (solo efforts)
- Doug Hasting (Rhinoceros)
- Loggins and Messina (Jim Messina)
- Manassas (Stephen Stills)
- Dewey Martin's Medicine Ball (Dewey Martin)
- Jim Messina (solo efforts)

- The Mynah Birds (Neil Young)
- Poco (Ritchie Furray, Jim Messina)

- Rhinoceros (Doug Hastins)
- Souther, Hillman, Furay Band (Ritchie Furray)

- The Squires
- Stephen Stills (solo efforts)

- Stephen Stills and Neil Young
- Neil Young (solo efforts) 

 

 


 

Genre: rock

Rating: **** (4 stars)

Title:  Buffalo Springfield

Company: ATCO

Catalog: SD 33-200

Year: 1966

Country/State: US/Canada

Grade (cover/record): VG+/VG+

Comments: slight ring wear

Available: SOLD

Catalog ID: SOLD

Price: SOLD $8.00

While their recording career proved exceptionally short, barely lasting two years, the Buffalo Springfield had a disproportionate effect on rock, influencing countless musicians over the ensuing three decades. The group's roots can be traced back to the early-'60s when singers/guitarists Stephen Still and Ritchie Furay were members of The Au Go Go Singers. Touring Canada they shared a date with Neil Young and The Squires (see separate entries). Two years later Stills and Young crossed paths on Sunset Boulevard (legend has it that Stills recognized Young's Hearse while sitting in a traffic jam). The unexpected reunion saw the pair decide to collaborate in starting a band. The lineup was quickly filled by recruiting bass player Robert Palmer (who had previously played with Young in The Mynah Birds), Stills old friend Ritchie Furay and ex-Dillards drummer Dewey Martin. 

Naming themselves The Herd, the group secluded itself for several months of intensive rehearsals. Already polished musicians and gifted with several exceptional writers, their initial forays onto the local club circuit immediately attracted a great deal publicity, including the attention of David Crosby and Roger McGuinn. The head Byrds were so taken with the band that he offered them an opportunity to open for The Byrds' (and The Beach Boys) on their spring 1966 concert tour. Publicity from the tour plus an extended stay at Los Angeles' famous Whiskey Au-Go-Go attracted the attention of producers/managers Charles Greene and Brian Stone. Signing on with Greene and Stone (best known for their work with Sonny and Cher), the group was subsequently signed by Ahmet Ertegun to Atlantic's ATCO subsidiary. 

Renamed The Buffalo Springfield (they reportedly took the name from a brand of steamroller), the group's reputation was further enhanced when they were featured in a summer concert at the Hollywood Bowl prior to the release of their first album.  Released in late 1966, and highlighting material from Stills and Young, the quintet's self-titled debut showcased a twelve song mixture of rock, folk and country influences. Recorded at breakneck speed and virtually live, the material on "Buffalo Springfield" was impressive, but producers Greene and Stone's decision to opt for a strip-down, live sound proved a major disservice. 

"Buffalo Springfield" track listing:
(side 1)

1.) Don't Scold Me
2.) Go and Say Goodbye (Stephen Stills) - 2:19
3.) Nowadays Clancy Can't Even Sing (Neil Young) - 3:26
4.) Everybody's Wrong

5.) Hot Dusty Roads

(side 2)

1.) Flying On the Ground
2.) Burned (Neil Young) - 2:14
3.) Do I Have To Come Right Out And Say It ?  (Neil Young) 
4.) Leave
5.) Pay the Price (Stephen Stills) - 2:35
6.) Out of My Mind (Neil Young) - 3:05

 

 



Genre: rock

Rating: **** (4 stars)

Title:  Stampede

Company: ATCO

Catalog: SD 33-200

Year: 1966

Country/State: US/Canada

Grade (cover/record): VG+/VG+

Comments: slight ring wear

Available: SOLD

Catalog ID: SOLD

Price: SOLD $8.00

 


Genre: rock

Rating: **** (4 stars)

Title:  Buffalo Springfield Again

Company: ATCO

Catalog: SD 33-226

Year: 1967

Country/State: US/Canada

Grade (cover/record): VG+/VG+

Comments: --

Available: 1

Catalog ID: 2009

Price: $20.00

 

 

Having enjoyed their first taste of popular success, the band suddenly found themselves wracked by a string of personnel problems. First on the list was Canadian bassist Bruce Palmer who was suddenly expelled from the country for visa violations. For touring purpose Palmer was replaced by Ken Koblun and then Jim Fielder; David Crosby filling in for the band's appearance at the Monterey Pop Festival. Following a confrontation with Stills, Young temporarily left; replaced by Doug Hastings. Working with an ad-hoc lineup, including Hastings and bassist Felder, the band recorded a follow up (even preparing the cover art), tentatively titled "Stampede." Ironically, in the wake of a band wide reconciliation the album was shelved, though it's widely available in bootleg format.

With Stills and Young at least briefly setting aside their differences, Young rejoined the band .  Supplemented by new bassist Jim Messina, the band returned to the studio for another shot at recording an officilal second album.  Working with a variety of producers, including themselves, the group somehow managed to persevere releasing 1967's "The Buffalo Springfield Again".  To my ears its always been interesting to note that even though they were now more a collection of talented solo acts with common backing, the second album was actually more consistent and polished than their debut.  As on the debut Stills ('Bluebird' and 'Rock and Roll Woman') and Young ('Broken Arrow' and 'Mr. Soul') were highlighted in the writing department. Though the pair captured the majority of attention,  the biggest surprise came in the form of Richie Furray's unexpected emergence. Completely in the background on the debut album, this time around Furay stepped up with three tunes, including the delicate 'A Child's Claim To Fame' which made for one of the set's highlights.  

"The Buffalo Springfield Again" track listing:
(side 1)

1.) Mr. Soul (Neil Young) - 2:35

Young reportedly wrote the tune after getting medical treatment for his epilepsy.   The song supposedly came to him in almost completed from, only taking about five minutes to complete.  It's simply one of the best mid-'70s rockers ever recorded; worth the cost of admission just for the blazing fuzz guitars and Stills seminal meltdown guitar solo.   A classic tune. YouTube has a classic clip of the band lip-synching the tune on a 1967 episode of the Hollywood Palace television program.   The recently deported Bruce Palmer was replaced by one of the band's roadies.  Worth viewing just to see Young in his period fringe: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ez7P6nNPWqs  No idea why it wasn't tapped as an American single, but at least the Dutch were smart enough to release it as a 45:

- 1967's 'Mr. Soul / Expecting To Fly' (Atlantic catalog number ATL-NP 03022)   rating: ***** stars
2.) A Child's Claim To Fame   (Richie Furay ) - 2:09

One of the prettiest tunes Furay ever wrote and the sweet, country-tinged harmonies (with Young quite prominent in the mix), have seldom been equaled.   James Burton on dobro.    rating: ***** stars
3.) Everydays  (Stephen Stills) - 2:38

With a distinctive jazz-psych vibe and some amazing sustained fuzz guitar from Young, 'Everydays' could easily been slotted on the first CSN&Y album.  It's probably the album's "sleeper" tune.  rating: *** stars
4.) Expecting To Fly   (Neil Young) - 3:29

For all intents and purposes 'Expecting To Fly' was a Young solo effort.  In fact the tune was originally intended for a Young solo project with Young being the only band member on the song (backing was provided by L.A. sessions players).   It was certainly one of his prettiest tunes, with a .  Producer Jack Nitzsche provided the orchestral arrangement that gave the song a haunting, almost ethereal feel. supposedly inspired by his first love.   ATCO tapped it as a single:

- 1967's 'Expecting To Fly' b/w 'Everydays' (ATCO catalog number 45-6545)     rating: **** stars
5.) Bluebird (Stephen Stills) - 4:28

After all these years 'Bluebird' remains one of Stills' masterpieces with some of the best electric and acoustic guitar interfaces ever recorded.   It was released as the album's sophomore single:

- 1967's 'Bluebird' b/w 'Mr. Soul' (ATCO catalog number 45-6499)  For the truly hardcore fan, the double LP retrospective set "Buffalo Springfield" includes an extended nine minute version of the tune.   rating: **** stars

(side 2)

1.) Hung Upside Down   (Stephen Stills) - 3:24

Another album sleeper - this one had a melody that took a little while to grow on you, but when it did ...  wow.   Always loved the Furay-Stills lead vocals and there was more than enough fuzz guitar to please the most hardcore fan.   rating: **** stars
2.) Sad Memory   (Richie Furay) - 3:00

Surrounded by Stills and Young, Furay was all but lost in the shadows.  If you trust the liner notes, this acoustic ballad was just Furay and Young.   Very pretty ballad.   rating: *** stars 
3.) Good Time Boy   (Richie Furay) - 2:11

Drummer Dewey Martin on vocals - who knew he sounded like a 70 year old soul man ...  Very atypical performance for the band.   rating: *** stars 
4.) Rock 'n' Roll Woman   (Stephen Stills) - 2:44

One of the band's most elaborate and complex arrangements, the tune was apparently inspired by Grace Slick with David Crosby providing a helping hand writing and on harmony vocals.   With the elaborate vocals and interwoven guitars, the tunes always reminded me a bit of a prototype CSN&Y tune.  Easy to see why ATCO tapped it as the leadoff single:

- 1967's 'Rock 'n' Roll Woman' b/w 'A Child's Claim to Fame' (ATCO catalog number 45-6519)   Neither the sound or video is all that good, but YouTube has a black and white clip of the band performing the tune at a November 1967 performance for ABC television's Poppendippity at the Warwick Musical Theater.  Yeah, Flip Wilson did the introduction:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3vRzcqVJOkU  rating: **** stars
5.) Broken Arrow   (Neil Young) - 6:13

'Broken Arrow' was another tune apparently intended for Young's aborted solo album.  Young was the only band member to participate in the original recording sessions,  Richie Furay's sweet supporting vocals added after the fact ...  Wow, where do you even start with this tune ... The song's suite-like structure certainly bore a debt to "Sgt Pepper", but with a folk-rock feel it captured Young at his most ambitious, or pretentious.   It was almost a sound collage including an opening live snippet from 'Mr. Soul', sound effects, dollops of jazzy experimentation, martial drums, and some of Young's most interesting, if puzzling lyrics. As to what it all meant?  After all these years I'm still at a loss.   If you want to see a song that elicits diverse opinions as to its meaning, this is it.   Vietnam, JFK's assassination, Watergate, lost nuclear weapons, Indian rights ...   the list of possible topics simply went on and on.    rating: **** stars

 

 

Supported by the three singles (two breaking into the top-100 charts), the parent album peaked at # 44, establishing the band as early FM favorites.  In spite of a troubled history it's a great album.  Perhaps the band's best overall release.

 

 

 



Genre: rock

Rating: **** (4 stars)

Title:  Last Time Around

Company: ATCO

Catalog: SD 33-256

Year: 1968

Country/State: US/Canada

Grade (cover/record): VG+/VG+

Comments: gatefold sleeve

Available: 2

Catalog ID: 208

Price: $15.00

 

In spite of their artistic and commercial successes, personality conflicts continued to get in the way with Buffalo Springfield leaders Stephen Stills and Neil Young continued to ravage the band.  Recording sessions for their next album quickly degenerated into a series of what were essentially solo efforts with various permutations of members refusing to participate with others in the same room and Young all but dropping out of the band (his debut solo album would hit the streets a couple of months after this album was released.  With band loyalty splintered between two factions and following a May 1967 Los Angeles concert, the group simply disbanded.  Furious at the loss of one of their biggest moneymaking franchises and determined to get another album out of their contract with the band, ATCO Records management commissioned late-inning Springfield bassist Jim Messina  to patch together a posthumous, contractual obligation collection.  Released in late 1968, "Last Time Around" featured a mixture of studio material previously recorded for what was to be the band's third album (several tracks including recently deported bassist Bruce Palmer).  Other tracks were little more than studio outtakes and miscellaneous odds and ends that Messina somehow managed to salvage.  Included in that category was the Messina original 'Carefree Country Day'.  With Young's contributions limited to three tracks (though two were admitted classics), that left Messina  to fill in the gaps with whatever he could get his hands on, which meant lots of material from Furay and Stills.   Ironically, in spite of it's ragtag roots, material such as Young's sweet "On the Way Home", Stills' burning "Questions" and Furay's lovely "Kind Woman" made for a surprisingly impressive and enjoyable set.  Certainly a reflection of each member's writing skills, the album also served as testimonial to producer Messina's skills. 

"Last Time Around" track listing:
(side 1)

1.) On the Way Home   (Neil Young) - 2:25

Neil Yong's written a ton of songs, but I have to tell you that this version of 'One the Way Home' with Ritchie Furay on lead vocals is one of my favorites.  One of Young's most commercial songs, this one had everything going for it; great melody, Furay's glistening vocals, nice, but understated horns, and a hook that wouldn't lead your head if you paid it.  Tapped as the album's third single it peaked at # 82 on the pop charts.   rating: **** stars

2.) It's So Hard To Wait    (Ritchie Furray - Neil Young) - 

One of three disappointments, 'It's So Hard To Wait' was a slow, mildly jazz-tinged number with a distinctive old-fashioned flavor.  Co-written by Furay and Young, the song's MOR-stance just seemed hopelessly out of place on the collection.   rating: ** stars

3.) Pretty Girl   (Stephen Stills) - 2:24

Penned by Stills, 'Pretty Girl' was a beautiful ballad, but sounded very much like a solo demo,  The echo percussion in background was really strange, though the effects guitar solos (Stills ?) was great ...  rating: *** stars

4.) Four Days Gone   (Stephen Stills) - 2:53

Apparently the tale of a a military deserter, or a draft dodger, 'Four Days Gone' was one of those wonderful, pensive, thought provoking numbers that Stills had a knack for crating.  With a great backing keyboard and some fantastic jangle guitars, this was another Stills career highlight.   rating: ***** stars

5.) Carefree Country Day   (Jim Messina) - 

The lone Jim Messina original, 'Carefree Country Day' was a breezy, country-tinged mid-tempo number.  Pretty, enough, but simply not in the same league as the rest of this stuff and the weird scat vocals at the end have always left me scratching my head.      rating: ** stars

-6.) Special Care   (Stephen Stills) - 3:30

Lyrically 'Special Care'  offered up another slice of Stills' political commentary.  Kicked along by some stabbing Stills organ and a blazing fuzz guitar solo (Buddy Miles guested on drums), this was one of the band's heaviest rock compositions.  Fantastic performance and easy to see why ATCO tagged it as the second single off the LP.   rating: **** stars

 

(side 2)

1.) In the Hour and Not Quite Rain   (Ritchie Furray - Mickie Callen) - 3:45

Unlike anything else the band recorded, I believe 'In the Hour and Not Quite Rain' had its roots in an August, 1967 radio station promotional contest.   Los Angeles station KHJ (BOSS 30) offered listeners $1,000 to come up with lyrics for a Buffalo Springfield song.  A woman by the name of Micki Callen had her submission picked by Bruce Palmer.  Apparently unaware their management company had pulled this promotional stunt (15,000 people submitted lyrics), the band initially refused to have anything to do with the stunt.  Always a good guy, Furay finally agreed to write the music for Callen's lyrics.  Complete with heavy orchestration (courtesy of arranger Jeremy Stuart) and a pseudo-psychedelic feel, for the longest time I thought the song showcased the band at their most pretentious.   I still feel that way, but my long-standing disdain for the song has gradually faded to a point where I can actually enjoy the song for what it is - an interesting piece of experimentation.   rating: *** stars

2.) Questions   (Stephen Stills) - 

Easily the album's most commercial performance, I've always wondered why ATCO didn't release this one as a single.  Stills seldom sounded as good on vocals and his fuzz guitar solo was worth the price of admission alone.  (Yes, Still re-purposed the track on CSN&Y's 'Carry On'.)  rating: **** stars

3.) I Am a Child   (Neil Young) - 2:15

The melancholy 'I Am a Child' was one of Young's best performances (not just on the album, but across his whole career).  You'll be hard pressed to find such a simple, stripped down song that packs such a wallop..  A rock classic that every fan should hear, if not have on their iPod (or record collection, depending on your age).   Only complaint - the song was too short.   rating: ***** stars

4.) Merry-Go-Round   (Ritchie Furay

Complete with harpsichord and carousel sound effects, 'Merry-Go-Round' was one of Furay's prettiest compositions  rating: *** stars

5.) Uno Mundo   (Stephen Stills) - 2:00

The Latin-flavored rocker served as a precursor to what Stills would try to accomplish with the band Manassas.  Shame he never managed to capture this tracks sense of fun and energy again.   I even like the horns.    rating: ***** stars

6.) Kind Woman   (Ritchie Furay) - 4:10

Furay's closer 'Pretty Woman' served as a near perfect transition to his country-rock career with Poco (future Poco member Rusty Young provided the pedal steel guitar).  One of his prettiest compositions, it would have made a wonderful single.  A bittersweet way for the band to call it quits     rating: ***** stars

 

The album was tapped for a series of three singles: 

 

- 1968's 'Uno Mundo' b/w 'Merry Go Round' (ATCO catalog number 45-6572)

- 1968's 'Special Care' b/w 'Kind Woman' (ATCO catalog number 45-6602)

- 1968's 'On the Way Home' b/w 'Four Days Gone' (ATCO catalog number 45-6615)

 

Not the best of their three studio sets, but still well worth tracking down (and it can still be found on the cheap).

 

Fans were certainly impressed, the album standing as the group's biggest seller, peaking at # 42. (In spite of the fact it was a collage with Young's image being pasted on to the picture of the other four band members, the result stands as one of my all time favorite album covers.  Perhaps unintentionally the uncredited cover photography/artist managed to nail Neil Young's typical against-the-grain personality.  (The collection was originally released with a gatefold sleeve.)


 



Genre: rock

Rating: *** (3 stars)

Title:  Retrospective

Company: ATCO

Catalog: SD 33-283

Year: 1968

Country/State: US/Canada

Grade (cover/record): VG+/VG+

Comments: 

Available: 1

Catalog ID: not yet listed

Price: $6.00

 

The following year Atlantic released an a passable "best of" collection entitled "Retrospective - The Best of Buffalo Springfield".  Pulling together the band's lone top-40 hit; several near hits and a couple of interesting album tracks, the compilation's biggest flaws were it's abbreviated track listing and the absence of detailed liner notes. Hitting #42, the album sold respectably, further benefiting ATCO's original investment.

"Retrospective - The Best of Buffalo Springfield" track listing:
(side 1)

1.) For What It's Worth (Stephen Stills) - 3:00
2.) Mr. Soul (Neil Young) - 2:35
3.) Sit Down I Think I Love You (Stephen Stills) - 2:30
4.) Kind Woman (Ritchie Furay) - 4:10
5.) Bluebird (Stephen Stills) - 
6.) On the Way Home (Neil Young) - 2:25

Neil Yong's written a ton of songs, but I have to tell you that this version of 'One the Way Home' with Ritchie Furay on lead vocals is one of my favorites.  One of Young's most commercial songs, this one had everything going for it; great melody, Furay's glistening vocals, nice, but understated horns, and a hook that wouldn't lead your head if you paid it.  Tapped as the album's third single it peaked at # 82 on the pop charts.   rating: **** stars

(side 2)

1.) Nowadays Clancy Can't Even Sing (Neil Young) - 3:26
2.) Broken Arrow (Neil Young) - 6:13
3.) I Am a Child (Neil Young) - 2:15

The melancholy 'I Am a Child' was one of Young's best performances (not just on the album, but across his whole career).  You'll be hard pressed to find such a simple, stripped down song that packs such a wallop..  A rock classic that every fan should hear, if not have on their iPod (or record collection, depending on your age).   Only complaint - the song was too short.   rating: ***** stars
4.) Go and Say Goodbye (Stephen Stills) - 2:19
5.) Expecting To Fly (Neil Young) - 3:29

 

 

 


Genre: rock

Rating: **** (4 stars)

Title:  Buffalo Springfield

Company: ATCO

Catalog: SD 2-806

Country/State: US/Canada

Year: 1973

Grade (cover/record): VG+/VG+

Comments: double LP; gatefold sleeve

Available: 3

Catalog ID: 6258

Price: $12.00

 

 

More than willing to capitalize on the members' outside successes, in 1973 Atlantic released a fairly comprehensive 23 track, double album retrospective set entitled "Buffalo Springfield".  Pulling together the cream of the band's studio catalog, the set included the hits, near hits, misses, and a couple of oddities (notably Young's 'Broken Arrow' and Furay's radio promotion 'In the Hour of Not Quite Rain.'  The set was also notable for including an extended nine minute version of 'Bluebird.'   While there were a number of notable absences including the Stills-penned "B" side "Go and Say Goodbye', Furay's 'Merry-Go Round', the 'Everydays' "B" side, let alone anything from the aborted "Stampede" project, the set was admirable in that it covered more material than the earlier "best of" compilation and served as the best band overview until the release the 2001 Neil Young compiled  four CD "Box Set".   Unfortunately the album proved a mediocre commercial success, peaking at # 104. (The album was originally released with a gatefold sleeve.)

"Buffalo Springfield" track listing:
(side 1)

1.) For What It's Worth   (Stephen Stills) - 3:00
2.) Sit Down I Think I Love You   (Stephen Stills) - 2:30
3.) Nowadays Clancy Can't Even Sing   (Neil Young) - 3:26
4.) Go and Say Goodbye   (Stephen Stills) - 2:19
5.) Pay the Price   (Stephen Stills) - 2:35
6.) Burned   (Neil Young) - 2:14
7.) Out of My Mind   (Neil Young) - 3:05

 

(side 2)
1.) Mr. Soul   (Neil Young) - 2:35
2.) Bluebird   (Stephen Stills) - 9:00
3.) Broken Arrow   (Neil Young) - 6:13
4.) Rock 'n' Roll Woman   (Stephen Stills) - 2:44

 

(side 3)
1.) Expecting To Fly   (Neil Young) - 3:29
2.) Hung Upside Down   (Stephen Stills) - 3:24
3.) A Child's Claim To Fame   (Ritchie Furay) - 2:09
4.) Kind Woman   (Ritchie Furay) - 4:10
5.) On the Way Home   (Neil Young) - 2:25

Neil Yong's written a ton of songs, but I have to tell you that this version of 'One the Way Home' with Ritchie Furay on lead vocals is one of my favorites.  One of Young's most commercial songs, this one had everything going for it; great melody, Furay's glistening vocals, nice, but understated horns, and a hook that wouldn't lead your head if you paid it.  Tapped as the album's third single it peaked at # 82 on the pop charts.   rating: **** stars
6.) I Am a Child   (Neil Young) - 2:15

The melancholy 'I Am a Child' was one of Young's best performances (not just on the album, but across his whole career).  You'll be hard pressed to find such a simple, stripped down song that packs such a wallop..  A rock classic that every fan should hear, if not have on their iPod (or record collection, depending on your age).   Only complaint - the song was too short.   rating: ***** stars

 

(side 4)
1.) Pretty Girl   (Stephen Stills) - 2:24

Penned by Stills, 'Pretty Girl' was a beautiful ballad, but sounded very much like a solo demo,  The echo percussion in background was really strange, though the effects guitar solos (Stills ?) was great ...  rating: *** stars
2.) Special Care   (Stephen Stills) - 3:30

Lyrically 'Special Care'  offered up another slice of Stills' political commentary.  Kicked along by some stabbing Stills organ and a blazing fuzz guitar solo (Buddy Miles guested on drums), this was one of the band's heaviest rock compositions.  Fantastic performance and easy to see why ATCO tagged it as the second single off the LP.   rating: **** stars

3.) Uno Mundo   (Stephen Stills) - 2:00

The Latin-flavored rocker served as a precursor to what Stills would try to accomplish with the band Manassas.  Shame he never managed to capture this tracks sense of fun and energy again.   I even like the horns.    rating: ***** stars
4.) In the Hour and Not Quite Rain   (Ritchie Furay - Micki Callen) - 3:45

Unlike anything else the band recorded, I believe 'In the Hour and Not Quite Rain' had its roots in an August, 1967 radio station promotional contest.   Los Angeles station KHJ (BOSS 30) offered listeners $1,000 to come up with lyrics for a Buffalo Springfield song.  A woman by the name of Micki Callen had her submission picked by Bruce Palmer.  Apparently unaware their management company had pulled this promotional stunt (15,000 people submitted lyrics), the band initially refused to have anything to do with the stunt.  Always a good guy, Furay finally agreed to write the music for Callen's lyrics.  Complete with heavy orchestration (courtesy of arranger Jeremy Stuart) and a pseudo-psychedelic feel, for the longest time I thought the song showcased the band at their most pretentious.   I still feel that way, but my long-standing disdain for the song has gradually faded to a point where I can actually enjoy the song for what it is - an interesting piece of experimentation.   rating: *** stars
5.) Four Days Gone   (Stephen Stills) - 2:53

Apparently the tale of a a military deserter, or a draft dodger, 'Four Days Gone' was one of those wonderful, pensive, thought provoking numbers that Stills had a knack for crating.  With a great backing keyboard and some fantastic jangle guitars, this was another Stills career highlight.   rating: ***** stars
6.) Questions   (Stephen Stills) - 2:52

Easily the album's most commercial performance, I've always wondered why ATCO didn't release this one as a single.  Stills seldom sounded as good on vocals and his fuzz guitar solo was worth the price of admission alone.  (Yes, Still re-purposed the track on CSN&Y's 'Carry On'.)  rating: **** stars

While Stills and Young continued to cross professional paths throughout the years (CS&N, CSN&Y, The Stills-Young Band), starting in the mid-'80s the original lineup began contemplating and discussing a full scale reunion. When the reunion failed to materialize, in 1987 Martin and Palmer formed and began touring as The Buffalo Springfield Revisited. The following year the original lineup actually reunited for a one-shot appearance at Atlantic's Records 40th Anniversary celebration. Under the Springfield nameplate, Martin continued to tour small venues through the early-'90s.

In 1997 the band was elected into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

 

 

 

 

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