Byrds, The


Band members                          Related acts

  line up 1 (1964-66)
- Gene Clark (RIP 1991) -- vocals, guitar 
- Michael Clarke -- drums 
- David Crosby (RIP 1993) -- vocals, guitar 
- Chris Hillman -- vocals, bass 
- Roger McGuinn -- vocals, guitar 

  line up 2 (1966-67)
- Gene Clark (RIP 1991) -- vocals, guitar 
- David Crosby (RIP 1993) -- vocals, guitar 
- Chris Hillman -- vocals, bass 

NEW - Kevin Kelly -- drums (replaced Michael Clark) 
- Roger McGuinn -- vocals, guitar 

 

  line up 3 (1967-68)

- Chris Hillman -- vocals, bass 
- Kevin Kelly -- drums 
- Roger McGuinn -- vocals, guitar 
NEW -- Gram Parsons (RIP) -- vocals, guitar, keyboards (replaced 

  David Crosby) 

  line up 4 (1968-69)
- Kevin Kelly -- drums (replaced Michael Clark) 
- Roger McGuinn -- vocals, guitar 
- Gram Parsons (RIP) -- vocals, guitar, keyboards 

NEW - Clarence White (RIP) -- vocals, guitar (replaced Gram Parsons)

 

 

 

- Skip Battin (aka Skip Battyn) (RIP 2003) -- vocals, bass,

  keyboards (replaced  John York) (1970-72 )
- Gene Clark (RIP 1991) -- vocals, guitar (1964-67 and 73) 
- Michael Clarke -- drums (1964-66)
- David Crosby (RIP 1993) -- vocals, guitar (1964-67 

  and 73)
- John Guerin -- drums (replaced Skip Battin) (1972)
- Chris Hillman -- vocals, bass (1964-68 and 73)
- Kevin Kelly -- drums (replaced Michael Clark) (1967- )
- Roger McGuinn -- vocals, guitar (1964-72 and 73)
- Gene Parsons -- vocals, drums, rhythm guitar, 

  harmonica (1969-72)
- Gram Parsons (RIP) -- vocals, guitar, keyboards 

  (replaced David Crosby) (1967- 72)
- Sneeky Pete -- pedal steel guitar
- Jimi Seiter -- drums, percussion (1971)
- Clarence White (RIP) -- vocals, guitar (replaced 

  Gram Parsons (1968-72)
- JayYork -- vocals, bass (replaced Chris Hillman)

  (1969-70)

 

  line up x (1973)
- Gene Clark (RIP 1991) -- vocals, guitar, harmonica
- Michael Clarke -- drums, percussion
- David Crosby (RIP 1993) -- vocals, rhythm guitar 
- Chris Hillman -- vocals, bass, mandolin
- Roger McGuinn -- vocals, lead uitar 

 

 

- Skip Battin (solo efforts)
- Gene Clark (solo efforts)
- David Crosby (solo efforts)
- David Crosby and Graham Nash
- Crosby, Still, Nash (& Young)
- The Dillard and Clark Expedition

- Evergreen Blueshoes (Skip Battin)
- Firefall (Michael Clarke)
- The Flying Burrito Brothers 

- Fusion (Kevin Kelly)
- Hammer (John Guerin)
- Chris Hillman (solo efforts)
- International Submarine Band (Gram Parsons)

- Jesse, Wolff and Whings
- Manassas
- Roger McGuinn (solo efforts)

- McGuinn, Clark & Hillman
- Gene Parsons (solo efforts)
- Gram Parsons (solo efforts)
- Sod (Jay York)
- Souther, Hillman, Furray Band
- Thunderbyrd (Roger McGuinn)

 

 


 

Genre: rock

Rating: ***** (5 stars)

Title:  The Notorious Byrd Brothers

Company: Columbia

Catalog: CS-9575

Year: 1968

Country/State: US

Grade (cover/record): VG / VG

Comments: initials 'RHEG" on front cover (top right corner)

Available: 1

Catalog ID: 4702

Price: $15.00

 

In hindsight it's amazing that this record ever came out, let alone stands as one of The Byrd's creative highlights.

 

The recording sessions for 1968's "The Notorious Byrd Brothers" were apparently quite trying with David Crosby's growing unhappiness with the rest of the band including his frustration with the band's refusal to record some of his new material (including the song 'Triad'), leading to his decision to call it quits early in the recording sessions (though the resulting album includes quite a bit of Crosby material).  Gene Clark was brought in as a replacement though he quickly decided the return was a mistake and left before recording any material.   Things turned ever uglier when drummer Mike Clarke quit half way through the album, forcing McGuinn and Hillman to bring in sessions drummer Jim Gordon to finish up.  

 

Against this backdrop, producer Gary Usher and the band somehow managed to cobble together a set that encompasses the best of their patented jangle-rock attack ('Goin' Back') with nods to country-rock ('Old John Robertson''), jazz ('Tribal Gathering') and touches of psych and outright experimentation.  Tracks such as Hillman's 'Natural Harmony', 'I Wasn't Born To Follow' and 'Change Is Now' actually combined all of these elements into one interesting aural stew. There were plenty of highlights, including the pair of Gerry Goffin and Carole King covers ('Goin' Back' and 'I Wasn't Born To Follow)', the anti-Vietnam themed 'Draft Morning' and the drug-themed 'Artificial Energy'.  Full of cutting edge experimentation (courtesy of producer Usher), the set was full of intriguing horn arrangements, phasing effects, early Moog synthesizers and then-bizarre guitar effects (check out McGuinn's work on 'Dolphins Smile' or the goofy Arthur C. Clarke inspired sci-fi number 'Space Odyssey').  In fact, with one or two minor exceptions ('Old John Robertson' comes to mind), every one of the eleven tracks is worth hearing.  Simply a classic 1960s rock album that lots of folks have overlooked !!!

 

"The Notorious Byrd Brothers" track listing:
(side 1)

1.) Artificial Energy   (Mike Clarke - Chris Hillman - Roger McGuinn) - 2:18

2.) Goin' Back  (Gerry Goffin - Carole King) - 3:26

3.) Natural Harmony   (Chris Hillman) - 2:11

4.) Draft Morning   (David Crosby - Chris Hillman - Roger McGuinn) - 2:42

5.) Wasn't Born To Follow  (Gerry Goffin - Carole King) - 2:04

6.) Get To You   (Chris Hillman - Roger McGuinn) - 2:39   

(side 2)

1.) Change Is Now  (Chris Hillman - Roger McGuinn) - 3:21

2.) Old John Robertson  (Chris Hillman - Roger McGuinn) - 1:49

3.) Tribal Gathering   (David Crosby - Chris Hillman) - 2:03

4.) Dolphins Smile   (David Crosby - Chris Hillman - Roger McGuinn) - 2:00

5.) Space Odyssey   (Hippard - Roger McGuinn) - 3:52

 

 


Genre: rock

Rating: ***** (5 stars)

Title:  The Notorious Byrd Brothers

Company: Columbia

Catalog: CS-9575

Year: 1968

Country/State: US

Grade (cover/record): VG/VG

Comments: initials 'RHEG" on front cover (top right corner)

Available: 1

Catalog ID: 4702

Price: $15.00

 

!!

 

"Dr. Byrds & Mr, Hyde" track listing:
(side 1)

1.) 

(side 2)

1.) 

 


Genre: country-rock

Rating: *** (3 stars)

Title:  Sweetheart of the Rodeo

Company: Columbia

Catalog: CS 9670

Year: 1969

Country/State: US

Grade (cover/record): VG/VG

Comments: --

Available: 1

GEMM catalog ID: 

Price: $8.00

 

Gene Clark and Chris Hillman had long been country music enthusiasts and even the most casual fans would have to admit the genre always played an important role in the development of the band's unique sound. That said, up to 1969 the group had avoided a dedicated effort to explore their country roots/interests. That changed with the addition of former International Submarine Band singer/guitarist Gram Parsons to the line up. 

 

Recorded in Nashville with Gary Usher again producing, release of "Sweetheart of the Rodeo" was delayed several months when Lee Hazelwood's L.H.I. label threatened Columbia with a lawsuit. Claiming Parsons was still under contract to L.H.I., the label demanded Parsons voice be deleted from any Byrds material (though he was allowed to furnish new material). Rather than fight the matter, The Byrds went back into the studio with Hillman and McGuinn taking turns dubbing their voices over the Parsons-sung tracks. Musically material such as the traditional "I Am a Pilgrim", a cover of Bob Dylan's "You Ain't Going Nowhere" and Parson's "One Hundred Years from Now" featured a pure country sound. Perhaps not a major surprise, while Hillman sounded thrilled to be singing material dear to their heart, on tracks such as "The Christian Life" and "Pretty Boy Floyd" McGuinn sounded rather tentative and uncomfortable. Moreover, while there was no denying the band's enthusiasm and passion for the genre, the set left longtime rock fans confused. Still, backed by an American tour and positive critical reviews the collection hit #77. Not bad, but far below earlier sales. (Naturally, three decades later the set's an acknowledged groundbreaking classic.) The results ignited another round of personnel changes: Hillman, Kleinow and Parsons defecting to pursue their interests in country music and to start The Flying Burrito Brothers (see separate entry). 

"Sweetheart of the Rode" track listing:
(side 1)

1.) You Ain't Going Nowhere   (Bob Dylan) - 
2.) I Am Pilgrim   (arranged by Chris Hillman - Roger McGuinn) - 
3.) The Christian Life   (F. Louvin - C. Louvin) - 
4.) You Don't Miss Your Water   (W. Bell) - 
5.) You're Still On My Mind   (L. McDaniel) - 

(side 2)

1.) Pretty Boy Floyd   (Woody Guthrie) - 
2.) Hickory Wind  (Gram Parsons - B. Buchannan) - 
3.) One Hundred Years from Now   (Gram Parsons) - 
4.) Blue Canadian Rockies   (C. Walker) - 
5.) Life Is a Prison   (Merle Haggard - J. Saunders) - 
6.) Nothing was Delivered   (Bob Dylan) -

 

 

 


Genre: rock

Rating: *** (3 stars)

Title:  Untitled

Company: Columbia

Catalog: G 38127

Year: 1970

Country/State: US

Grade (cover/record): VG / VG

Comments: gatefold sleeve; double LP

Available: 1

GEMM catalog ID: 3

Price: $9.00

 

1970's Jim Dickinson (live sides) and Terry Melcher (studio material) produced "Untitled" is one of those albums I pull out and play every couple of months when I need a blast of classic folk-rock.  Interestingly, my opinion continually changes as to whether I like the concert sides or the studio material better.  

 

Following the release of "Easy Rider" Roger McGuinn had begun a collaboration with clinical psychologist/musical producer Jacques Levy on a country-rock concept set (tentatively entitled "Gene Tryp").  The project was eventually abandoned, though McGuinn salvaged several of the songs for "Untitled".  In the meantime having finally settled down into a fairly stable line up consisting of bassist Skip Battin, Roger McGuinn, drummer/multi-instrumentalist Gene Parsons and singer/guitarist Clarence White, McGuinn and Columbia Records decided to release a double LP set featuring a mixture of live material and new studio numbers (including some of the "Gene Tryp" numbers.

 

Kicked along by White's country tinged guitar flourishes the band's country-rock influences were quite apparent on tracks like the instrumental 'Nashville West', the oldies 'Mr. Tambourine Man' and 'Mr. Spaceman', but the overall sound was muddy, but surprisingly muscular.  Showcasing a positively ominous sound and McGuinn's instantly recognizable Rickenbacher, The Byrds seldom rocked out harder than on the opener 'Lover of the Bayou',  'So You Want To Be a Rock 'n Roll Star' may have been harmony starved, but had a nice taunt edge, while their side long 'Eight Miles High' jam showcased some excellent guitar work, though clocking in at 16 minutes it quickly generated into mindless excess (do you really need to hear five minutes of a Skip Battin bass solo?).  Interestingly, with the exception of McGuinn's 'Chestnut Mare' the studio sides were largely slammed by critics.  Personally I like their country-rock outings.  Sure, 'Chestnut Mare' was the last classic Byrds tune, but their Little Feat over 'Truck Stop Girl' (with White handling the lead vocal), 'Just a Season' (one of McGuinn's prettiest songs) and 'All Things' (the latter another "Gene Tryp" recovery project) were all enjoyable.  For a double album set the collection certainly sold well,. eventually going top-40 while the single 'Chestnut Mare' b/w 'Just a Season' (Columbia catalog number 4-45259) also did well.

 

"Untitled" track listing:
(side 1)

1.) Lover of the Bayou   (Roger McGuinn - Jacques Levy) - 3:40

2.) Positively 4th Street   (Bob Dylan) - 2:03

3.) Nashville West (instrumental)    (Graham Parsons - Clarence White) - 2:00

4.) So You Want To Be a Rock 'n Roll Star   (Chris Hillman - Roger McGuinn) -  2:37

5.) Mr. Tambourine Man   (Bob Dylan) - 2:18 

6.) Mr. Spaceman   (Roger McGuinn) - 3:11

 

(side 2)

1.) Eight Miles High   (Roger McGuinn - David Crosby - Gene Clark) - 16:15

 

(side 3)

1.) Chestnut Mare   (Roger McGuinn - Jacques Levy) - 5:10

2.) Truck Stop Girl   (Lowell George - Bill Payne) - 3:19

3.) All Things   (Roger McGuinn - Jacques Levy) - 3:05   

4.) Yesterday's Train   (Gene Parsons - Skip Battin) - 3:32

5.) Hungry Planet   (Skip Battin - Kim Foley - Roger McGuinn) - 5:00

 

(side 4)

1.) Just a Season   (Roger McGuinn - Jacques Levy) - 3:54

2.) Take a Whiff (On Me)   (arranged Clarence White - Roger McGuinn) - 3:28

3.) You All  Look Alike   (Skip Battin - Kim Foley) - 3:04

4.) Well Come Back Home   (Skip Battin) - 7:45

 



Genre: rock

Rating: *** (3 stars)

Title:  Byrdmaniax

Company: Columbia

Catalog: KC 30640

Year: 1971

Country/State: US

Grade (cover/record): VG/VG

Comments: minor ring, edge and corner wear; gatefold sleeve

Available: 1

GEMM catalog ID: not listed yet

Price: $8.00

 

 

Co-produced by Terry Melcher and Chris Hinshaw, 1971's "Byrdmaniax" found the band (now including Jimi Seiter on drums), continuing to cast around for musical cohesion and direction. With creative mainstay Roger McGuinn contributing four tracks the remaining selections were divided between three covers (one track from former member Gram Parsons and three from Skip Battin (all three co-written with Kim Fowley)). Musically diverse, the set included stabs at gospel ("Glory Glory"), C&W ballads ("Pale Blue"), Dylan-styled ballads (check out the uncanny resemblance on "Tunnel of Love") and even '30s-cabaret ("Citizen Kane"). While the entire set was listenable, it was seldom truly exciting. Best of the lot were McGuinn's "I Trust" and an early cover of Jackson Browne's "Jamaica Say You Will". Absent an American supporting tour (the band briefly toured England), or a hit single the collection peaked at #64. The LP was also notable for sporting one of the year's most memorable covers - the inner sleeve showed how they did it. (The collection was originally released with a gatefold sleeve.)

"Byrdmaniax" track listing:
(side 1)

1.) Glory, Glory (A. Reynolds) - 4:03
2.) Pale Blue (Roger McGuinn) - 2:20
3.) I Trust (Roger McGuinn) - 3:29
4.) Tunnel of Love (Skip Battin - Kim Fowley) - 3:29
5.) Citizen Kane (Skip Battin - Kim Fowley) - 2:35
6.) I Wanna Grow Up To Be a Politican (Roger McGionn - Jacques Levy) - 2:02

(side 2)

1.) Absolute Happiness (Skip Battin - Kim Fowley) - 2:36
2.) Green Apple Quick Step (Gene Parsons - Clarence White) - 1:49
3.) My Destiny (H. Carter) - 3:59
4.) Kathleen's Song (Roger McGionn - Jacques Levy) - 2:39
5.) Jamaica Say You Will (Jackson Browne) - 3:25

 

 



Genre: rock

Rating: *** (3 stars)

Title:  Byrds

Company: Asylum

Catalog: SD 5058

Year: 1973

Country/State: US

Grade (cover/record): VG / VG+

Comments: gatefold sleeve; minor cover wear

Available: 2

Catalog ID: 111

Price: $9.00

 

Given the acrimonious circumstances surrounding the breakup of the original Byrds line-up, the fact the five principals agreed to reunite for this 1973 set is a minor miracle.  While the results may not have come close to their prime mid-1960s catalog, I'll step away from most of the critics and tell you the results weren't bad.  A bit too country-tinged for my tastes, but still generally enjoyable.

 

I'm no Byrds scholar, but as I understand the circumstances, following the release of 1972's "Farther Along" Roger McGuinn had grown frustrated with growing personnel issues within the band and decided to retire The Byrds nameplate.   That decision was set aside when the original line up of McGuinn, Gene Clark, Michael Clarke, David Crosby, and Chris Hillman decided to reunite.  The reunion itself seems to have been based more on economical necessities  than artistic desire.  While all of the members had enjoyed post-Byrds careers, with the exception of Crosby, none had done particularly well financially.  With that in mind, as early as 1971 the five original members had been talking about a reunion project.  The reunion took off when Asylum president David Geffen offered to finance a Byrds reunion.  With Crosby assigned production duties "The Byrds" was billed as a true Byrds reunion, but from a musical  standpoint there was precious little collaboration between the five.  Clark, Crosby, McGuinn and Hillman were each represented by two compositions, with the track listing rounded out with a cover of Joni Mitchell's 'For Free' and a pair of Neil Young covers ('Cowgirl In the Sand' and '(See the Sky) About To Rain').  The results sounded very much like a musical cooperative (a-la Beatles "White Album"), as opposed to a true band effort - note the cover lists each members name.  It also meant the album was dependent on the caliber of material each of the songwriters brought to the recording sessions and with the exception of Clark, it sounded like the other participants kept their best tunes for planned future solo releases.  With Hillman and McGuinn actively touring during the recording sessions with Manassas and a late inning version of The Byrds, what you got was a somewhat haphazard collection of previously written and recorded numbers (McGuinn's 'Born To Rock 'n Roll' and Crosby's 'Laughing'), passable new efforts (Hillman's 'Borrowed Time' and McGuinn's 'Sweet Mary'), and the three cover tunes.  

- Clark was always the band's secret weapon and he showed that again with the breezy opener 'Full Circle'.   Normally a country track like this wouldn't have done a great deal for me but Clark's clear voice, coupled with the group's shimmering backing vocals and Hillman's mandolin made for one of those songs that's hard to shake out of your head,   In spite of the apt title and lyrics, the song was actually written before The Byrds reunion and had previously appeared on Clark's 1972 "Roadmaster" album under the title 'Full Circle Song'.   Asylum also tapped it as the lead-off single.   rating: **** stars

- Co-written by McGuinn and Jacques Levy, 'Sweet Mary' featured a folk-ish sound.  While McGuinn's instantly recognizable voice was in good form, the song itself wasn't anything special.  Hillman's mandolin again provided the major draw.  rating: ** stars

- With Clark returning to the spotlight, 'Changing Heart' offered up another breezy country-rock number.   Clark handled lead vocals and the harmonica solo, while the rest of the band contributed sterling harmony vocals.  One of the album's most commercial offerings.   rating: *** stars

- Crosby's laconic cover of Joni Mitchell's 'For Free' was pretty, but hardly earth shattering.   rating: *** stars

- Side one ended with the album's first true rocker - McGuinn's 'Born To Rock 'n Roll'.   Recorded with an earlier Byrds line-up and shelved, I've go to tell you this re-recorded version wasn't particularly impressive.  McGuinn apparently felt the same way about the performance, subsequently re-recording the song a third time for his 1975 solo album "Roger McGuinn & Band".  In case anyone cares, the third version wasn't much better.   rating: ** stars

- Co-written with Manassas alumnus Dallas Taylor, seven years after the original line up called it quits, Chris Hillman finally got a shot at the spotlight with 'Thing Will Be Better' and in doing so he came the closest to capturing the original line-up's magic.  The lyric featured another life-is-tough-as-a-rock-star lyric, but the melody was a charming, up-tempo effort with McGuinn's best guitar work.  This one should have been a major hit for the band.     rating: **** stars

- Clark was reportedly the driving force in the decision to include a pair of Neil Young covers and he handled lead vocals on 'Cowgirl In the Sand'.  The band's wonderful talent for harmony vocals was spotlighted on this one giving the song kind of a pseudo-CSN&Y feel.   rating: *** stars

-  Another look at the star making system, Crosby seldom sounded as pissed off as on 'Long Live the King' though the presence of a third set of life-is-tough-as-a-rock-star lyrics did little to improve the song.  In contrast, McGuinn turned in a tasty lead guitar on this one.   rating; *** stars

- The second Hillman contribution (co-written with Joe Lala), 'Borrowed Time' was catchy enough, but didn't have much staying power.   rating: ** stars

- Crosby retook the spotlight with a remake of 'Laughing'.   Crosby wrote the song in 1967 and it was originally planned as a Byrds release. The track subsequently made its debut on Crosby's 1971 "If I Could Only Remember My Name" album.    This version got a slightly more conventional arrangement and included some cool raga-flavored McGuinn lead guitar.   rating: **** stars

- Thanks to Hilllman's mandolin and McGuinn's patented Rickenbacker, the band's cover of Young's '(See the Sky) About To Rain' ended the album on a high note.  No matter how much you loved Young's original, you'll have to admit this version was much easier on the ears.   rating: **** stars

 

As mentioned above, Asylum pulled out all the strings to score a hit, releasing a string of singles off the album:

 

  US releases:

- 1973's 'Full Circle' b/w 'Long Live the King' (Asylum catalog number AS 11016)  # 109 pop

- 1973's 'Cowgirl In the Sand' b/w 'Long Live the King'  (Asylum catalog number AS 11019)

 

  UK and European releases:

- 1973's 'Things Will Be Better' b/w 'For Free' (Asylum catalog number AYM 516)

 

And if you had to rate each member's contributions, how would they come out?

 

# 1 - Gene Clark; great voice; one nice original in 'Changing Heart' and an even better remake ('Full Circle'), plus credit for the two Neil Young covers.

# 2 - David Crosby; great vocals on all three of his leads; nice original in 'Long Live the King' and a decent remake of 'Laughing'.

# 3 - Chris Hillman - turned in the most likeable performance on the album via 'Things Will Be Better', which was somewhat offset by the forgettable 'Borrowed Time'

# 4 - Roger McGuinn - two of the album's duller songs, though he turned in a couple of nice moments on lead guitar, including some signature jangle rock on '(See the Sky) About To Rain'

 

In spite of lukewarm reviews from the critics (Rolling Stones' Jon Landau described it as "one of the dullest albums of the year"), strong marketing by Asylum saw the album hit the top-20 charts.  It certainly would have done better had the reunited band followed through on a planned tour.  McGuinn subsequently formally disbanded The Byrds and within a matter of months each of the members had returned to outside projects.


"Byrds" track listing:
(side 1)

1.) Full Circle   (Gene Clark) - 2:43

2.) Sweet Mary   Roger McGuinn - Jacques Levy) - 2:55

3.) Changing Heart   (Gene Clark) - 2:42

4.) For Free   (David Crosby) - 3:50

5.) Born To Rock 'n Roll   (Roger McGuinn) - 3:12

 

(side 2)

1.) Thing Will Be Better   (Chris Hillman - Dallas Taylor) - 2:13

2.) Cowgirl In the Sand   (Neil Young) - 3:24

3.) Long Live the King   (David Crosby) - 2:17

4.) Borrowed Time (Chris Hillman - Joe Lala) - 2:00

5.) Laughing   (David Crosby) - 5:38

6.) (See the Sky) About To Rain   (Neil Young) - 3:49

 

 

 

 

Genre: rock

Rating: **** (4 stars)

Title:  Sanctuary

Company: Sundazed

Catalog: LP-5061

Year: 2000

Country/State: US

Grade (cover/record): VG/VG

Comments: --

Available: 1

GEMM catalog ID:

Price: $8.00

 

I'm not going to even get into the details of this one.  The first of a planned multi-set program, 2000's "Sancutary" is a must-own for anyone who calls themselves a Byrds fan.  Full of original singles, alternate takes and a couple of previously unreleased efforts, this is classic Byrds from start to finish.  Excellent liner notes to boot.

 

"Sanctuary" track listing:
(side 1)

1.) All I Really Want To Do  (Bob Dylan) - 2:02 (single version) 

2.) I'll Feel A Whole Lot Better (alternate version)     (Gene Clark) - 2:28 

3. You Won't Have To Cry (alternate version)    (Gene Clark - Roger McGuinn) - 2:07

4.) It's No Use (alternate version)   (Gene Clark - Roger McGuinn) - 2:24

5. She Don't Care About Time (version 1)   (Gene Clark) - 2:36

6. It's All Over Now, Baby Blue (version 1)    (Bob Dylan) - 3:04

7. The World Turns All Around Her (alternate mix)    (Gene Clark) - 2:12

(side 2)

1.) The Day Walk  (Gene Clark) - 3:00

2.) Why (alternate version)   Roger McGuinn - David Crosby) - 2:40

3.) John Riley (instrumental version) (instrumental)   (traditional) - 3:10

4.) Psychodrama City   (David Crosby) - 3:23

5.) Mind Gardens (alternate version)   (David Crosby) - 3:14

6.) Lady Friend   (David Crosby) - 2:31

7.). Old John Robertson (single version)   (Roger McGuinn - Chris Hillman) - 1:05

 

 

 

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