Dee, KiKi


Band members               Related acts

- KiKi Dee - vocals

 

 

 

- none known

 

 


 

Genre: pop

Rating: ** (2 stars)

Title:  Patterns

Company: Liberty

Catalog: LST-7613

Year: 1969

Country/State: UK

Grade (cover/record): VG/VG

Comments: "audition copy" stamp on back cover

Available: 1

GEMM catalog ID: 4138

Price: $25.00

Cost: $1.00

 

Can't say I'm a big Kiki Dee fans, but this 1969 set (her first US LP?), is mildly entertaining.  Produced by Jack Baverstock, 1969's "Patterns" finds Dee trying to find a commercial niche somewhere along the lines of Jackie DeShannon, or Lulu.  Exemplified by material such as the title track, 'Excuse Me' and 'When We Get There' the album's full of heavily orchestrated, moody adult pop.  Dee certainly has a nice voice, but at least to my ears most of the material is simply to routine to make much of an impact.  Among the isolated exceptions are a couple of "girl group" sounding numbers - 'With a Kiss' and 'How Can I Run Away From You'.   

 

"Patterns" track listing:

(side 1)

1.) Excuse Me   (Dick Addrisi - Don Addrisi)

2.) Sunshine   (Ray Jessel) - 1:57

3.) Patterns   (Barbara Cooper - Frank Catana) - 2:36

4.) With a Kiss   (Tony Powers - George Fischoff) - 2:59

5.) When We Get There   (Paul Anka) - 2:39

6.) How Can I Run Away From You   (Bert Berns) - 2:37

 

(side 2)

1.) I   (Gary Knight - L. Russell Brown) - 2:21

2.) We've Got Everything Going for Us   (Philip Springer - Irwin Levine - 2:20

3.) I Dig You Baby   (L. Ellison - Dennis Lambert - S. Bell) - 2:28

4.) Stop and Think   (David Cumming - Peter Sterling) - 2:27

5.) Don't Destroy Me   (Irwin Levine - Judy tree) - 2:22

6.) I'm Going Out (The Same Way I Came In)   (Bob Crewe - Gary Knight) - 2:43 

 

Liberty 56030 promotional Patterns / I'm Going Out


Genre: pop

Rating: ** (2 stars)

Title:  Stay with Me

Company: Rocket

Catalog: BXL 1-3011

Year: 1978

Country/State: UK

Grade (cover/record): VG/VG

Comments: original inner sleeve; small cut out notch along side

Available: 1

GEMM catalog ID: 4733

Price: $9.00

Cost: $1.00

 

Complete with expensive packaging, an 'A' list of sessions players and a large promotional budget, here's an album that just screams of being built for massive commercial success ... and misses the target by a country mile.

 

Produced by Bill Schnee, 1978's "Stay with Me' was Dee's last released for Elton John's Rocket Records.  First the good news.  Dee was in good voice throughout the collection and it started out with a great track.  'One Stop' had all of the ingredients required to be a massive radio hit and Rocket actually tapped it as a single (catalog JH-11413) though it did nothing in terms of sales.  Almost as good was the title track which served as another unsuccessful shot as a single.  Unfortunately from there it was largely downhill.  Tracks such as 'Talk To Me', 'Don't Stop Loving Me' and 'Love Is a Crazy feeling' were apparently intended to showcase Dee as an AOR torch singer but the results were simply plodding and dull.

 

"Stay with Me" track listing:

(side 1)

1.) One Stop   (Tom Snow - Glen Ballard) - 3:26

2.) Talk To Me   (Kiki Dee - David Lasley - Zane Buzby) - 3:21

3.) Don't Stop Loving Me   (Kiki Dee - David Lasley - Zane Buzby) - 4:17

4.) Dark Side of Your Soul   (Kiki Dee - David Lasley - Zane Buzby) - 4:40

5.) Stay with Me   (Jerry Ragovay - George Weiss) - 3:58

 

(side 2)

1.) One Jump Ahead of the Storm   (Troy Seals - Joe New) - 3:23

2.) You're Holding Me Too Tight   (Frannie Gold - Cynthia Weil) - 3:58

3.) Love Is a Crazy feeling   (Bias Boshell - Davey Jonstone) - 4:21

4.) Safe Harbor   (David Lasley - Lana Marrano) - 4:19

 

 

 

Review by Joe Viglione

Bill Schnee's production on Kiki Dee's final album for Rocket records is the problem with Stay With Me. None of the passion that Clive Franks and Elton John poured over Loving and Free can be found here, nor the directness and authority Pip Williams gave to 1981's Perfect Timing disc on RCA. Kiki Dee is in good voice, but her originals, like "Don't Stop Loving Me" and "Dark Side of Your Soul," don't go any further than being nice album tracks. It was insightful of this huge crew to take on the Ten Wheel Drive classic, Jerry Ragavoy's "Stay With Me," let alone title the album after that chestnut a year before it would get further recognition. Bette Midler would bring the song to a huge worldwide audience as it became the pivotal moment in The Rose, Janis Joplin/Doors producer Paul Rothchild polishing the pearl, a song of ultimate desperation. There is nothing desperate on this album of glossy adult contemporary music which switches hats too many times. The wild abandon Ten Wheel Drive put behind Genya Ravan's soulful version on their Brief Replies album is absent here. "One Jump Ahead of the Storm" sounds like a watered-down "I've Got the Music in Me," while Tom Snow and Hank Ballard's "One Step" is light '70s dance pop. Cynthia Weil and Frannie Golde's "You're Holding Me Too Tight" is out and out disco and is indicative of the project: top-shelf names going through the motions. Kiki Dee's catalog is more important than she's ever been given credit for, from Great Expectations on Motown to the Gus Dudgeon-produced I've Got the Music in Me album. Stay With Me is a perfect example of how the wrong pairing of artist and producer can have drastic results. Davey Johnstone and her longtime keyboard player Bias Boshell's "Love Is a Crazy Feeling" is one of the albums highlights. It and the final track, "Safe Harbor," is worthwhile, but the staggering array of name people, arrangers Marty Paich, Jim Horn, Sonny Burke, Gene Page, keyboard players galore from Tom Snow to James Newton-Howard drummers like Jim Keltner and Jeff Porcaro, the presence of Steve Porcaro, Steve Lukather, even the thanks to Jackie DeShannon and Randy Edelman for "stepping in," all go to waste, and an album at an important time in her career, two years after her number one hit with Elton John, misses the mark by a mile. It does feature the best packaging of her music, beautiful photos and jacket design, but none of the momentum of albums that came before and after.

 

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