Doobie Brothers, The


Band members                          Related acts

  line up 1 (1969-70)

- John Hartman -- drums, percussion 

- Tom Johnston -- vocals, guitar 

- Greg Murphy -- bass 

- Patrick Simmons -- vocals, guitar

 

  line up 2 (1970-71)

- John Hartman -- drums, percussion 

- Tom Johnston -- vocals, guitar

NEW - Dave Shogren -- bass (replaced Greg Murphy)

- Patrick Simmons -- vocals, guitar

 

  line up 3 (1971-73)

- John Hartman -- drums, percussion 

NEW - Mike Hossack -- drums 

- Tom Johnston -- vocals, guitar

NEW - Tiran Porter -- bass (replaced Dave Shogren)

- Patrick Simmons -- vocals, guitar

 

  line up 4 (1973-74)

- John Hartman -- drums, percussion 

- Tom Johnston -- vocals, guitar

NEW - Keith Knudsen (RIP 2005) -- drums, percussion 

  (replaced Mike Hossack) 

- Tiran Porter -- bass (replaced Dave Shogren)

- Patrick Simmons -- vocals, guitar

 

  line up 5 (1974-75)

NEW - Jeff Skunk Baxter -- lead guitar 

- John Hartman -- drums, percussion 

- Tom Johnston -- vocals, guitar

- Keith Knudsen (RIP 2005) -- drums, percussion 

  (replaced Mike Hossack) 

- Tiran Porter -- bass (replaced Dave Shogren)

- Patrick Simmons -- vocals, guitar

 

  line up 5 (1975-79)

- Jeff Skunk Baxter -- lead guitar 

- John Hartman -- drums, percussion 

- Keith Knudsen (RIP 2005) -- drums, percussion 

  (replaced Mike Hossack) 

NEW - Michael McDonald -- vocals, keyboards (replaced

  Tom  Johnston) 

- Tiran Porter -- bass (replaced Dave Shogren)

- Patrick Simmons -- vocals, guitar

 

  line up 5 (1975-81)

NEW - Cornelius Bumpus -- sax, keyboards

- Keith Knudsen (RIP 2005) -- drums, percussion 

  (replaced Mike Hossack) 

NEW - Chet McCracken -- drums, percussion (replaced 

  John Hartman)

- Michael McDonald -- vocals, keyboards (replaced

  Tom  Johnston) 

NEW - John McFee -- lead guitar (replaced 

  Jeff Skunk Baxter)

- Tiran Porter -- bass (replaced Dave Shogren)

- Patrick Simmons -- vocals, guitar

 

  line up 6 (1981-83)

- Cornelius Bumpus -- sax, keyboards

- Keith Knudsen (RIP 2005) -- drums, percussion 

  (replaced Mike Hossack) 

- Chet McCracken -- drums, percussion (replaced 

  John Hartman)

- Michael McDonald -- vocals, keyboards (replaced

  Tom  Johnston) 

- John McFee -- lead guitar (replaced 

  Jeff Skunk Baxter)

- Patrick Simmons -- vocals, guitar

NEW - Willie Weeks -- bass (replaced Tiran Porter)

 

  line up 7 (1988-)

- John Hartman -- drums, percussion 

- Mike Hossack -- drums 

- Tom Johnston -- vocals, guitar

- Bobby LaKind (RIP 2003) -- percussion 

- Tiran Porter -- bass

- Patrick Simmons -- vocals, guitar

 

 

-

- Barefoot Jones (Dave Shogren)

- Bonaroo (Mike Hossack)

- Clover (John McFee)

- Corny and the Corvettes (Cornlius Bumpus)

- The Del Rays (Michael McDonald)

- DFK (Mike Hossack)

- Ron Gardner Group (Dave Shogren)

- Help (Chet McCracken)

The Hoodoo Rhythm Devils (Keith Knudsen)

- Tom Johnston (solo efforts)

- Mandelbaum (Keith Knudsen)

- Michael McDonald (solo efforts)

- Mike And The Majestics (Michael McDonald)

- Moby Grape (Cornelius Bumpus)

- Mourning Reign (Mike Hossack)

- Roadhouse (Mike Hossack)

- Patrick Simmons (solo efforts)

- Sons of Champlin (Dave Shogren)

- Steely Dan (Jeff Skunk Baxter and Michael McDonald)

- Ultimate Spinach (Jeff Skink Baxter)

 

 

 


 

Genre: rock

Rating: 4 stars ****

Title:  The Doobie Brothers

Company: Warner Brothers

Catalog: BS 1919
Year:
 1972

Country/State: San Jose, California

Grade (cover/record): VG+ / VG+

Comments: --

Available: 1

GEMM catalog ID: 5734

Price: $15.00

 

So here's the background on this one ...  In 1969 drummer John Hartman relocated to Los Angeles for was originally intended as a job with a reunited Moby Grape.  The Moby Grape job didn't pan out, but Grape guitarist Skip Spence subsequently introduced Hartman to singer/guitarist Tom Johnston.  The two found common ground and decided to form a band recruiting bassist Greg Murphy and Spence.  As Pud, they went though a number of line-ups, but by 1970 had stabilized as a quartet showcasing 

bassist Dave Shogrun and singer/guitarist Patrick Simmons.  The group's club and bar gigs began attracting a local following throughout Northern California (including a sizable Hells Angels contingent).  They also decided on a name change, eventually deciding on 'The Doobie Brothers' which was an apparent nod to one of their preferred sources of entertainment.

 

band signing with Warner Brothers

left to right: Simmons - Hartman - Johnston - Shogren

 

Co-produced by Lenny Warnoker and Ted Templeman, 1971's "The Doobie Brothers" served as the band's debut, though they'd previously recorded considerable material that Warner Brothers management inexplicably elected to shelve (much of it appeared on the 1980 "Introducing the Doobie Brothers" set).  With Johnston and Simmons responsible for all of the material, the collection may come as somewhat of a surprise to anyone raised on the band's mid-1970s top-40 hits.  Powered by Johnston's instantly recognizable slurred voice, tracks like 'Nobody', 'Feelin' Down Farther' and the rocker 'Beehive State' weren't all that different from the forthcoming hits.  Melodies that climbed into your head and wouldn't let go; surprisingly sweet harmony vocals, and a pounding rhythm section in the form of Hartman and Shogren were all in ample supply.  On the other hand, tracks like 'Slippery St. Paul', 'It Won't Be Right' and '' featured a largely acoustic sound (with an emphasis on Simmons wonderful finger picking) that would large disappear with the following albums.  The relatively simple arrangements and production caught me off guard the first couple of times I heard the LP, but I'll readily admit that it's something that's grown on me over the years.  Here The Doobies were a band enjoying the chance they'd been given willing to take a chance with material that wasn't overly radio friendly, rather than a band anxious to hold on to their commercial breakthroughs.  Plenty of highlights including Greenwood Creek', and the pretty ballads 'Travelin' Man' (bet they didn't play that one in front of a Hells Angels crowd), and 'Closer Every Day'.  Warner Brothers tapped the album for a series of three singles, though none did much commercially:

 

- 1971's 'Nobody' b/w 'Slippery St. Paul' (Warner Brothers catalog number 7495) 

- 1971's 'Travelin' Man' b/w 'Feelin; Down Farther' (Warner Brothers catalog number 7527) 

- 1971's  'Beehive State' b/w 'Closer Every Day' (Warner Brothers catalog number 7544)

 

In spite of the fact it's been released a couple of times, this one remains largely unknown, including amongst many Doobie fans.  Not exactly rare, but not one you run into everyday.

 

"The Doobie Brothers" track listing:
(side 1)

1.) Nobody   (Tom Johnston ) - 3:42

2.) Slippery St. Paul   (Pat Simmons) - 2:14

3.) Greenwood Creek   (Tom Johnston ) - 3:04

4.) It Won't Be Right   (Tom Johnston ) - 2:38

5.) Travelin' Man   (Tom Johnston ) - 4:25

 

(side 2)
1.) Feelin' Down Farther   (Tom Johnston ) - 4:20

2.) The Master   (Tom Johnston ) - 3:30

3.) Growin' a Little Each Day   (Tom Johnston - Pat Simmons) - 3:20

4.) Beehive State   (Randy Newman) - 2:42

5.) Closer Every Day   (Pat Simmons) - 4:19

6.) Chicago (adapted by Pat Simmons) - 1:40

 

 


Genre: rock

Rating: 4 stars ****

Title:  Introducing the Doobie Brothers

Company: Pickwick

Catalog: SPC 3721
Year: 1980

Country/State: San Jose, California

Grade (cover/record): VG+ / VG+

Comments: --

Available: 1

GEMM catalog ID: 5533

Price: $75.00

 

Recorded in 1969 and finally released in 1980 (amidst questionable circumstances), "Introducing the Doobie Brothers" showcased a series of eight demos the band recorded and reportedly mailed to Warner Brothers' A&R department.  Warner Brothers executives were so impressed by the tapes, they signed the band sight unseen, resulting in the release of the band's official debut - 1971's "The Doobie Brothers".   My own experience has been that 'recently discovered' demos tend to be somewhat disappointing due to crappy sound quality and middling material.  Not the case here.  In remastering the original tapes Bob McNabb did a great job in terms of sound quality and the Johnston and Simmons penned originals were all worth hearing.  Only  'Blue Jay' had previously seen the light of day and that was buried on Rhino's 1999 four CD boxed set retrospective "Long Train Running".  While a little raw, the trademarked Doobies sound was instantly recognizable on Johnston-penned tracks like 'Coke Can Changes', 'Make It Easy' and 'Quicksilver Princess'.   Similarly, Simmons counterpart was on display via his two contributions - 'Be Yourself' and 'Runaround Ways'.  While some folks lean to the Michael McDonald led blue-eyed soul band, to my ears this was one of the best line ups - Hartman's power drumming set the benchmark for all of the follow-on line ups, Johnston and Simmons displayed a great and widely overlooked one-two lead guitar punch, and few bands could match their harmonizing - check out the country-rock ballad 'Pauper's Diary'.  Anyhow, all told a great LP, far better than any of their 'comeback' material and well worth looking for.  Speaking of, the album apparently ran into legal issues with the band and Warner Brothers both threatening legal action.  Pickwick quickly stopped distribution, making copies somewhat difficult to track down.

 

"Introducing the Doobie Brothers" track listing:
(side 1)

1.) Be Yourself   (Patrick Simmons) - 2:50

2.) Coke Can Changes   (Tom Johnston) - 3:20

3.) Blue Jay   (Tom Johnston) - 4:58

4.) Make It Easy   (Tom Johnston) - 3:54

 

(side 2)
1.) Quicksilver Princess   (Tom Johnston) - 2:43

2.) Runaround Ways   (Patrick Simmons) - 2:42

3.) Pauper's Diary   (Tom Johnston) - 3:46

4.) I'll Keep On Giving   (Tom Johnston) - 3:45

 

 

 

 

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