Farmer, Lee


Band members               Related acts

- David Blackwell -- drums, percussion

- Lee Farmer (RIP 2004) -- vocals, guitar, keyboards,

  synthesizers

- Jerry Pack -- lead guitar

- Kathryn Yates -- guitar, backing vocals, percussion

 

 

 

- unknown

 

 

 


 

Genre: rock

Rating: 3 stars ***

Title:  To a Western Sky

Company: Soliloquy

Catalog: --

Year: 1977

Country/State: Tennessee

Grade (cover/record): VG+ / VG+

Comments: --

Available: 1

GEMM catalog ID: 4984

Price: SOLD $150.00

 

 

I know absolutely nothing about singer/guitarist Lee Farmer other than he was apparently living in Birmingham, Alabama when he recorded this excellent 1977 solo album.  

 

Clearly a self-finance vanity project, "To a Western Sky" had quite a few things going for it.  Among those attributes, Farmer had a nice voice that was quite commercial, was a capable guitar player, wrote some interesting material, and as the producer and arranger ensured that the album had surprisingly impressive sound quality for a private press release.  While it wasn't the Pink Floyd-influenced masterpiece some dealer lists would have you believe, material like the title track and 'It's a Dream' included occasional Floyd-ish soundscape.  A more apt description would place material like 'Tennessee' and 'No One Left I Can Talk To' in the moody singer/songwriter vein.  Much of the set had a late night downer vibe to it that would probably appeal to lots of folks.  Mind you the album wasn't perfect.  The instrumental 'Loose and Easy' was more appropriate for a lite jazz album, 'Kingston Springs Hills' was a conventional country boogie number, while 'I Miss That Girl' wouldn't have sounded out of place on a Poco album (though it sported a nice acoustic guitar solo).   Still, this was better than 95% of the sensitive/songwriter and real person crap you'll stumble across.  And the guy was from Alabama to boot ...

 

"To A Western Sky" track listing:
(side 1)

1.) To a Western Sky   (Lee Farmer) - 6:05

2.) Tennessee   (Lee Farmer - Jerry Pack) - 4:35

3.) Loose and Easy (instrumental)   (Lee Farmer) - 3:40

4.) It's a Dream   (Lee Farmer) - 4:40

5.) I Miss That Girl   (Lee Farmer) - 3:45

(side 2)
1.) Kingston Springs Hills   (Jerry Pack) - 2:30

2.) What To Do   (Jerry Lloyd - Lee Farmer) - 5:00

3.) No One Left I Can Talk To   (Lee Farmer) - 4:00

4.) Funque (instrumental)   (Jerry Pack - Lee Farmer) - 4:00

5.) I'm Giving You This Song   (Jerry Pack) - 3:40

 

This was one of those acts I never expected to uncover - too obscure; name was too common, etc.  Lo and behold the power of the internet:

 

My father was Lee Farmer.  He passed away July 9, 2004.  He played with many people over time.  I saw his album and I just wanted to give you some tidbits.  

That was the only LP he did.  He traveled with various groups like Blue Blazes, Chill Jammers, and Elvis Wade.  He was a talent agent for Andrew Jackson and Cletus T Judd among others.  He spent the most of his time as a choir director of Priest Lake Presbyterian Church and then the Ashland City United Methodist Church.  He spent the remainder of the time guiding and recording younger musicians.  He was born and raised in Tennessee, spending his childhood in Pegram, Tennessee.  (The ball park there is named after his father, my grandfather, George Lee Farmer.)  After Graduating in 1975, he went to college in Georgia, where he met up with the band.  He traveled all over the world, actually, with different groups (I don't have the complete list).  Because of his connections, he usually went to Germany once a year.  Later in life he traveled with the religious Urantia group performing music across the globe.

Natasha Farmer  

April 2009

 

 

 

 

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